Resources, Unit 3, Unit Guidelines

Helpful Tips for Unit 3

Remember that Unit 3 is a bibliographical analysis, NOT an argumentative research paper. Don’t waste your time making points that you will only have to repeat in your Unit 4 paper! Don’t take a side on the issue yet! The main thing you should be doing in THIS assignment is analyzing your bibliography. What do the sources you have chosen say? How do they work together? What about them (who they were written by, where/when they were published, their authors’ rhetorical strategies) matters most?

Here is the Unit 3 Rubric .

Here are some questions to keep in mind while writing Unit 3 in order to get a good grade on the assignment:

-Do you have a purposeful, strong thesis? Does each successive paragraph contribute to the development of this thesis? Is your thesis organizational in nature, as opposed to argumentative?

-Which of the three organizational schemes suggested in the prompt (Historical Timeline, Multiple Issues or Contrasting Sides) are you using?

-When thinking about this organizing scheme, which of the questions from the prompt (the six that you completed for homework) were the most helpful or revealing?

-Do you mention all 8-10 sources at some point in your paper? Are you using these sources as specific examples/support for claims you make in your paper? Do you use in-text citation properly? Have you included an MLA-formatted Works Cited page?

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Resources, Unit 2

Annotated Bibliography Resource

Here’s a guide from Cornell University on how to create an annotated bibliography.

The guide gives the following example of an entry:

Waite, Linda J., Frances Kobrin Goldscheider, and Christina Witsberger. “Nonfamily Living and the Erosion of Traditional Family Orientations Among Young Adults.” American Sociological Review 51.4 (1986): 541-554. Print.

The authors, researchers at the Rand Corporation and Brown University, use data from the National Longitudinal Surveys of Young Women and Young Men to test their hypothesis that nonfamily living by young adults alters their attitudes, values, plans, and expectations, moving them away from their belief in traditional sex roles. They find their hypothesis strongly supported in young females, while the effects were fewer in studies of young males. Increasing the time away from parents before marrying increased individualism, self-sufficiency, and changes in attitudes about families. In contrast, an earlier study by Williams cited below shows no significant gender differences in sex role attitudes as a result of nonfamily living.

The writer of this annotation compares it to another source he or she is using, which is great. Remember, in the annotated bibliography you create for English 102, I want you to be really explicit in stating how each source will be used.

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